Various 311 Album Reviews


Music ALbum Reviews

"...311 have the rap-metal groove down colder than the Beasties, and they surely play reggae more convincingly than the Chili Peppers ever have. But what puts this combo on the cutting edge isn't its sound but its songs..." Musician 3/93, p.94




Blue Album Reviews

"...ear candy with good beats, not just bludgeon-by-numbers guitars....311 have a tight, sinewy sound that for all of its obvious Beasties-cum-Chili Peppers traits has a potent reggae undertow..." Rolling Stone 12/26/96, p.195




Live Album Reviews

from

Equal parts funk, hip-hop and heavy rock, 311 is a bash-you-over-the-head, high energy, low complexity band -- and proud of it. It's the kind of sound that's often best experienced live, so, duh, here it is.

311 Live is a collection of 14 songs recorded during the band's 1996-97 tour to support the studio disc, Transistor. Many of the tracks, however, are oldies but goodies like "Homebrew" and "Down," one of the megaton-funky songs that propelled 311's self-titled 1995 disc into the Billboard Top 15. Those two songs, which start the disc, define 311: big funk, big beats, maximum intensity all the way.

"Freak Out" grabs an old-time, Sly and the Family Stone-style funk riff before exploding into a rap-heavy track. "Galaxy" is introduced with huge, nasty guitar sounds, as is "Light Years" -- but there, they metamorphose into a reggae groove. "Nix Hex" takes off into a loose, relaxed, imaginative jam. Together since 1990, 311 have the fluid, playful feel of a band that's supremely comfortable together, and clearly having fun.

Daina Darzin


from
Some bands sound better recorded live than recorded in the studio, and 311 is no exception. The songs on 311 Live carry an edge 311's studio recordings lack, an edge that's meant to be in their music. 311 began in Omaha, Nebraska, and worked their way up by touring, so their sound was developed through playing live, and sounds best that way.

311 is classified as "alternative rock/rap-metal", and in performance, those influences, along with others, become apparent. Songs like "Beautiful Disaster" have an ethereal post-punk/early new wave sound with deep, passionate guitar licks. The band's 70's roots are revealed in "Freak Out", and "Who's Got the Herb" takes on a Rasta vibe worthy of any Bob Marley devotee. Many of these elements get buried in their studio recordings.

Live really highlights the many talents of this band - their ability to effortlessly slip in and out of different musical styles, to be hard and driving then mellow, sometimes within the same song. Yet, nothing sounds out of place.

Live portrays 311 in their primal glory - the way they're meant to be.

Elizabeth Gariti


"...shows 311 is gifted at capturing their studio sound in concert..." Spin 1/99, p.117



Import-311 Live

From
Some bands sound better recorded live than recorded in the studio, and 311 is no exception. The songs on 311 Live carry an edge 311's studio recordings lack, an edge that's meant to be in their music. 311 began in Omaha, Nebraska, and worked their way up by touring, so their sound was developed through playing live, and sounds best that way.

311 is classified as "alternative rock/rap-metal", and in performance, those influences, along with others, become apparent. Songs like "Beautiful Disaster" have an ethereal post-punk/early new wave sound with deep, passionate guitar licks. The band's 70's roots are revealed in "Freak Out", and "Who's Got the Herb" takes on a Rasta vibe worthy of any Bob Marley devotee. Many of these elements get buried in their studio recordings.

Live really highlights the many talents of this band - their ability to effortlessly slip in and out of different musical styles, to be hard and driving then mellow, sometimes within the same song. Yet, nothing sounds out of place.

Live portrays 311 in their primal glory - the way they're meant to be.

Elizabeth Gariti